EU helping to attract tourists to Nove Misto community in Lviv region

There is a mini-bakery in the village of Deshychi of  Stary Sambir district. Almost every day, children from Lviv, Skhidnytsia, Truskavets and the surrounding villages come here for creative workshops on baking bread and pastry. Children knead dough themselves, decorate and bake bread, draw pictures using flour, and have fun with animators. The mini-bakery was opened as part of the “COWBoyky: Ukrainian Wild West” project, which promotes tourism in the Nove Misto amalgamated community. The project is funded by the EU as part of the Mayors for Economic Growth initiative. Read more

EU funds inclusive film festival in Kyiv

Inclusivity has ceased to be something faraway and incomprehensible for Ukraine. One step after another, little by little, we are bringing ourselves to the state of mind in which we no longer look away but act, help and win. Win, first of all, over firmly-entrenched prejudices which, worse than any spokes in our wheel, slow us down on the way toward not as much European as humane future. Talking about inclusivity is as necessary as believing in these words and understanding them: we are all equal, and we all welcome each other. To be sure, talking about certain things isn’t that easy sometimes, and that’s when art comes to rescue. Read on to find out about Eurofest: Cinema for Everyone, the first inclusive film festival, about the feature presentations and the perception of each other without labels and clichés. Read more

Creative Europe helps protect cultural space near Kyiv

According to a survey carried out by Razumkov Centre, almost 70% Ukrainians have never left the country and 36% didn’t read a single book in 2018. ‘If people don’t want to go to culture themselves, then we bring culture to them’, says Anna Dobrova. Dobrova is the co-founder of the public organisation ‘MistoDia’, which helps develop cultural centres on the outskirts of Kyiv. Read more

EU funds sign language theatre performance in Kharkiv

Kharkiv’s Ariadne Mimics and Gesture Theatre has 25 volunteer actors with complete or partial hearing loss. A grant from the EU-funded “Upshift Ukraine” project helped them stage a contemporary adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “The Tamign of the Shrew”, buy costumes, curtains and lighting. The performance is adapted for all spectators – all the dialogues are voiced by announcers, there is music and dancing. The company is going on tour in Ukraine and dreams to make a movie in sign language  sometime in the future. Read more